National Alcohol Awareness Month – April 2021

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April

It takes more than a day to educate the American youth about the risks of getting stewed. April marks National Alcohol Awareness Month and is sponsored by the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence (NCADD) to educate the masses about America’s #1 health problem: alcohol dependence. Claiming the lives of more than 90,000 people every year, this month focuses on raising awareness about alcohol abuse and dependency before it is fatal.

History of National Alcohol Awareness Month

First started in 1987, National Alcohol Awareness Month was founded by the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence (NCADD) as an extension to the temperance movement of the 1800s.

Marty Mann founded the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence (NCADD). She was one of the early members of Alcoholics Anonymous and the first woman to have successfully gone through a 12-step group. She founded NCADD to help people like her get counseled and treated for alcoholism and dedicated this group to key medical and scientific research for the community. Encouraged by the massive number of families going into recovery, NCADD marked April to bring about a nationwide change by using communication tools to cultivate awareness about binge drinking and how much more dangerous it can be than just a night of fun.

The Council leverages traditional and social media campaigns during April to draw attention to the causes of alcoholism and the risks of alcohol dependence, and encourages people to talk about this disease. It aims to foster responsible attitudes by designating a month of candid discussions and information sharing, while reaching out to the American public via community-sponsored awareness activities and campaigns designed to prevent alcoholism.

Since its inception in 1987, National Alcohol Awareness Month has saved many lives from alcohol-related deaths. Some of the ways the NCADD has made it possible to fight alcoholism is by launching personalized campaigns every year, Alcohol-Free-Weekend encouraging abstinence, and seeking help for someone if they are unable to. The D.A.R.E (Drug Abuse Resistance Education) and Know Your Limits campaigns have also instilled much-needed information about the harmful effects of alcohol consumption in children from an early age.

National Alcohol Awareness Month timeline

1800s
Temperance Movement

A social movement to brand alcohol consumption as a public health concern begins.

1920
Ban on Alcohol

The manufacture, sale, and consumption of alcohol is banned under U.S. law.

1933
Surrender to Alcoholism

As a result of the ban, the illegal trade of alcohol booms, leading to the cancellation of the prohibition law.

1980s
National Alcohol Awareness Month

NCADD marks April as National Alcohol Awareness Month to spark important conversations.

National Alcohol Awareness Month FAQs

What is the ribbon color for alcoholism?

The red ribbon is a symbol for the prevention of alcohol addiction and misuse.

What is binge drinking alcohol?

Binge drinking is when blood alcohol concentration comes to 0,08 g/dL, which happens when a man drinks five glasses and a woman drinks four in about two hours.

Is alcohol bad for health?

Long-term, excessive drinking of alcohol can gravely affect your health and leads to chronic diseases including high blood pressure, liver disease, digestive problems, and even cancer.

How To Observe National Alcohol Awareness Month

  1. Participate in the Alcohol-Free-Weekend

    As part of National Alcohol Awareness Month, NCADD encourages the public to spend 72 hours without alcohol. Make sure you and your family participate in this activity and monitor symptoms of discomfort or cravings within the three days.

  2. Start conversations

    It is your role as a responsible adult to initiate the conversations that nobody is willing to talk about. Speak with your friends and families who you’ve noticed are reliant on heavy drinking. As a parent, teach your children about alcohol misuse and help them build coping skills. Tell them that stress, anger, loneliness, and peer pressure are a part of life and should not cause them to give in to liquor for relaxation.

  3. Throw ‘clean’ parties

    Use the month of April to throw alcohol-free, clean, and healthy parties for adults. Invite over friends, neighbors, and family to enjoy social gatherings without any trace of liquor. Serve kombucha, mocktails, club soda, and booze-free beer to set an example. Consider doing this thrice a month for healthy practice!

5 Facts About Alcohol Consumption That Will Blow Your Mind

  1. Alcohol use disorder

    An estimated 414,000 adolescents aged 12 to 17 have alcohol use disorder in the U.S.

  2. Alcohol-impaired driving deaths

    It accounts for 10,625 deaths, which is 29% of the overall driving fatalities.

  3. It’s taking a toll on the economy

    In 2010, binge-drinking-related costs reached $249 billion.

  4. It makes students perform poor in academics

    A report revealed that one in every four college students have trouble focusing on studies and receive lower grades overall.

  5. And for fun…

    Interestingly, when aging, white wine gets darker and red wine gets lighter.

Why National Alcohol Awareness Month Is Important

  1. Denial in alcoholism is a real disease

    Anybody suffering from substance abuse or struggling with alcoholism would deny it. They underestimate their ability to control the craving or to quit, the amount of alcohol they drink, and the impact it has had on their life. Denial is a common trait or symptom of alcoholism that has to be counseled.

  2. There’s a stigma surrounding alcoholism

    What comes to your mind when you think about alcoholism? A drunk man living in rags on the streets, drinking hard liquor on the job, and appearing at the bar every night? The movies’ depiction of alcoholism is only a quarter of the truth, and this is why millions of people have trouble recognizing the problem or seeking help.

  3. Alcoholism claims thousands of lives annually

    Alcoholism is the third-leading preventable cause of death in the United States, claiming the lives of more than 90,000 people every year.

National Alcohol Awareness Month dates

YearDateDay
2021April 1Thursday
2022April 1Friday
2023April 1Saturday
2024April 1Monday
2025April 1Tuesday