ThuJun 3

National Chocolate Macaroon Day – June 3, 2021

National Chocolate Macaroon Day is celebrated on June 3 every year. Chocolate macaroons are a popular dessert made with chocolate, icing sugar, egg whites, and nut garnishings. Macaroons are available in a range of flavors but chocolate macaroons remain an undisputed favorite among everyone. A rich, creamy chocolate-filled macaroon is an instant mood lifter and deserves a separate day of celebration! The day is celebrated at patisseries, cooking schools, and even at home. Schedule your next cheat day for June 3 to celebrate National Chocolate Macaroon Day with your loved ones.

History of National Chocolate Macaroon Day

A macaroon is a small cake or cookie. The chief ingredients in a macaroon are almond powder, egg whites, and ground sugar. Flavors are added as per individual preference. Some dessert lovers also add coconut shavings, condensed milk, and ground nuts for added flavor. The macaroons are baked on edible rice paper in an oven.

It is believed that macaroons originated some time in the 8th or 9th century in an Italian monastery. The desserts were introduced in France in 1533 when monks from the monastery joined King Henry II’s pastry chef. A few centuries later, two Benedictine nuns named Sister Marie-Elizabeth and Sister Marguerite sold macaroons to pay for rent during the French Revolution.

Their macaroons became famous in the French province and the sisters were known by the name of ‘Macaroon Sisters’ throughout Europe. The dessert has now become synonymous with French cuisine and today some of the best macaroons can be tasted in France. The dessert also enjoys great popularity in other European, Asian, and Latin American countries.

We have Mrs. Esther Levy to thank for popularizing the great American macaroon. In 1871, Mrs. Levy published the “First Jewish American Cookbook.” She originally published this recipe in the chapter on cakes as there was not a chapter on cookies. However, this is understandable, as the texture of a macaroon isn’t very cookie-like. It is soft and a little chewy, more like a cake than a cookie. However, the bite-size serving is most definitely cookie-like.

Macaroons deserve to be celebrated and recognized for their own characteristics. Coconut was substituted for almond flour when the first coconut palms planted in Florida began to yield fruit. Thus, macaroons are not only tasty little delights, they were also an early exercise in the locavore movement, eating produce grown close to home.

National Chocolate Macaroon Day celebrates the especially indulgent and rich flavor of chocolate and encourages those with a sweet tooth to try out this flavor. Chocolate macaroons taste best with a cup of tea or a glass of crisp white wine.

National Chocolate Macaroon Day timeline

8th or 9th Century
Macaroons are Born

Macaroons are first made by Italian monks — the name originates from the Italian word ‘maccarone,’ meaning ‘paste.’

1725
The Recipe is Written Down

One of the first recipes for macaroons appears in Robert Smith’s “Court Cookery.”

1871
The Mother of Macaroons

Esther Levy publishes “The First Jewish-American Cookbook” featuring a recipe for macaroons.

20th Century
Original Macaroons

Macaroons are originally served as a single cookie.

National Chocolate Macaroon Day FAQs

How is National Macaroon Day celebrated?

Bake some macaroons, eat them, and gift them to friends or family. 

What is National Macaroon Day?

National Macaroon Day falls on May 31 to celebrate this American cookie.  

What day is today's national holiday?

How to celebrate National Chocolate Macaroon Day

  1. Make some macaroons

    Look up an easy recipe online for chocolate macaroons and try making some at home. Make sure you have eggs, chocolate, almond powder, and icing sugar in the pantry before you get started on your mission.

  2. Indulge in some chocolate macaroons

    Head to your nearest patisserie and treat yourself to some delicious chocolate macaroons. Remember to bring some home so that you can help yourself to them even after National Chocolate Macaroon Day is over.

  3. Post on social media

    You can take photos of your favorite chocolate macaroons and post them online with the hashtag #NationalChocolateMacaroonDay. Don’t forget to also post photos of the macaroons that you’ve baked for the day!

5 Facts About Macaroons That Will Blow Your Mind

  1. They didn’t originate in France

    French macaroons might be the most loved but the dessert didn’t originate here — the first recipes for macaroons came from Italy.

  2. It’s often confused with French macarons

    Macaroons are often confused with the popular macaron, and although they have similar ingredients, the two sweets are vastly different in appearance, though some people use the terms interchangeably.

  3. It has fewer calories compared to other sweets

    A cupcake may contain up to 600 calories while a macaroon has about 70–100 calories!

  4. Macaroons are available in weird flavors

    Macaroons are also available in a bunch of weird flavors like wasabi, foie gras, and Cheetos!

  5. It’s favored by Jewish people

    Macaroons became popular and favored by Jewish people due to their unleavened nature, meaning they can be enjoyed throughout the Passover period.

Why we love National Chocolate Macaroon Day

  1. It’s a day of indulgence

    National Chocolate Macaroon Day is all about indulging in your favorite treat without feeling guilty about it. Treat yourself to this sinful sweet and don’t worry about the calories!

  2. It celebrates a historical recipe

    Macaroons have been around for centuries now. This day also celebrates a historical recipe that has been personalized by different cultures with locally available ingredients.

  3. Because we love chocolates

    Chocolates are everyone’s favorite and what can be better than macaroons filled with or dipped in rich, creamy chocolate? It’s a day of celebration for both chocolate and macaroon lovers!

National Chocolate Macaroon Day dates

YearDateDay
2021June 3Thursday
2022June 3Friday
2023June 3Saturday
2024June 3Monday
2025June 3Tuesday