​National Assisted Living Week – September 9 2018 – 15

​Established by the National Center for Assisted Living

Many of us know someone who has either worked or resided in an assisted living environment. Assisted living facilities provide thorough care and a sense of community for older adults and individuals living with disabilities. Celebrating National Assisted Living Week gives us a chance to recognize all of the staff, volunteers, and communities that play a vital role in making these facilities a success. So get ready, September 9-15 is a week to point out the amazing things that go on within the world of assisted living.

National Assisted Living Week - History

​1995
Welcome, National Assisted Living Week​

The National Center for Assisted Living started National Assisted Living Week.

​1970s
Concept of assisted living introduced ​

Thanks to Jessie F. Richardson and her daughter, Dr. Keren Wilson, the concept of assisted living became more mainstream. ​

​1965
Medicare & Medicaid​

Medicare and Medicaid arrived, influencing the development of modern nursing facilities. ​

​1935
The U.S. passed social security

Retired workers began taking advantage of Social Security benefits. ​

1823
Indigent Widows’ and Single Women’s Society​ opened

One of the first homes to dedicate itself to the care of the elderly was opened in Philadelphia.​

How to Observe National Assisted Living Week

1. Visit someone in an assisted living facility
Whether it is a family member or friend, make it a point to visit someone. Whomever you are stopping by to see is sure to appreciate the visit, and you will have the chance to catch up on old times and become more familiar with the community.

2. Take an assisted living facility tour
Many assisted living communities offer tours to help acquaint the public with the services provided. A tour will help familiarize you with all of the amazing things that take place there on a daily basis.

3. Create something special for residents
Consider writing a few letters or gathering a group of kids together to design art projects. These thoughtful gifts are sure to put a smile on just about anyone's face.

​5 Important Things To Remember About Assisted Living And Aging

1. ​We're living longer

By 2040, it's estimated that there will be 14.1 million people over 85.

2. ​Where my girls at?

The Assisted Living Federation of America has estimated that the female to male ratio in assisted living communities is 7:1.

3. ​Growing older is expensive

One in five seniors racks up more than $25,000 in care costs in a given year. ​

4. ​It's never too late to start exercising

Research has found that beginning to exercise at 75 or even 80 can help to reduce unwanted effects of aging. ​

5. ​Most of us will need long-term care

Almost 70 percent of Americans will end up needing long-term care in their life. ​

Why National Assisted Living Week is Important

A. It's an opportunity for assisted living communities to host events and activities
Unless you know someone who lives in an assisted living facility, you may not be familiar with many of their services. National Assisted Living Week serves as a time for these communities to host special events — ranging from lectures to volunteering opportunities.

B. National Assisted Living Week highlights great work
The week helps to fight any stigmas that people may have about choosing to reside in a place other than the home they have lived in for years. Thanks to National Assisted Living Week many people find that these facilities are great housing options.

C. Each year has its own theme
This year, it's "Capture the Moment." The theme has the goal of inspiring assisted living facility residents to seize the day and take advantage of all that life has to offer. Now, that's a mission we can get behind.

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