Got an idea for a holiday? Send it to us

Submit Now

National Day of Solidarity with Muslim Arab and South Asian Immigrants – February 20, 2023

In an exhibition of humanity, Americans observe the National Day of Solidarity with Muslim, Arab, and South Asian Immigrants every February 20. The day is characterized by a show of support to the affected groups and the organizing of special events to rebuke unjust treatments meted out on them in the U.S., following the infamous September 11 attacks. Many Americans have long spoken against the trampling of Muslim and Arab immigrants’ rights when the government began incarcerating the latter. This day further strengthens the support shown to the affected minority groups.

History of National Day of Solidarity with Muslim Arab and South Asian Immigrants

Starting from 2002, in the wake of the 9/11 terror attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon in 2001, the American government through the activities of the newly created Homeland Security, started a crackdown on all Muslim and Arab immigrants. Nearly two thousand people were rounded up and incarcerated by the government. This unfair treatment prompted some groups of individuals, including both Muslim groups and other non-religious groups to embark on a campaign of standing with not only Muslims and Arabs, but also the South Asian immigrants who were unjustly treated many decades back. The movement led to the first observation of the National Day of Solidarity with Muslim, Arab, and South Asian Immigrants.

The 9/11 terror attacks in the U.S. were no doubt terrible and cowardly acts on the nation that has affected the lives of many citizens up until this day. The attacks cost over 2,000 American lives and millions of dollars. Its effects are still felt today. However, as grave as the act was, it is not any justification for the unjust treatment of groups who could not be found with anything incriminating relating to the attacks. This was why the words of the famous mid-20th century Nazi pastor, Martin Niemoeller, haunted many and prodded them to speak against the government’s wrong retaliation.

Nearly a decade after the attack, some politicians still preached the subjugation of Muslims. Notable among them is congressman Peter King, who in 2011, uttered so many anti-muslim speeches without having concrete proof to back his claims with. And that is why for two decades running, the day is still observed — to continue the fight against indiscrimination against Muslim and Arab immigrants.

National Day of Solidarity with Muslim Arab and South Asian Immigrants timeline

2001
The 9/11 Attacks

The terror attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon are carried out by terrorists who hijack four passenger planes.

2002
Creation of Homeland Security

The Homeland Security Advisory System is introduced and starts rounding up Muslims and Arabs.

2004
Launch of U.S.-VISIT

The U.S. government launches a system that requires fingerprints and photographs of all visitors to the U.S. to be taken.

2011
Anti-Muslim Speeches

Congressman Peter King intensifies his anti-muslim campaign and speeches but lacks majority backing.

2019
Positive Identification of Victims

A cumulative 60% of the remains of victims of the W.T.C. attack are positively identified.

National Day of Solidarity with Muslim Arab and South Asian Immigrants FAQs

When did the 9/11 attack take place?

The attack took place on September 11, 2001, in the early hours of the morning — a few minutes to six a.m. U.S. time.

What U.S. city has the largest Muslim population?

The Michigan city of Dearborn is said to have the largest Muslim population in the U.S.

Why did Muslims migrate to America?

In earlier years, Muslims came to America through slavery, a vast majority of who were African Muslims. Today, Arab Muslims and others come to America for the same reason most other immigrants do.

How to Observe National Day of Solidarity with Muslim Arab and South Asian Immigrants

  1. Join the rally

    Take part in the rallies and campaigns advocating for equal treatment of Arabs, Muslims, and South Asians. Your voice will make a significant change and impact.

  2. Get close to the marginalized groups

    If you cannot take part in a rally, then engage in a conversation with any Arab, Muslim, or South Asian immigrants you know. Make them feel welcome, and listen to their stories.

  3. Be kind

    Simply being kind to Arabs, Muslims, and South Asian immigrants is another great way to observe and demonstrate the day. You might not be in a position to change the status quo, but your decision to treat them kindly means a lot to them.

5 Facts About The 9/11 Terror Attack You Should Know

  1. Not the first

    A bombing that killed six people was the first terror attack on the World Trade Center, as opposed to the 9/11 attacks believed by many to be the first.

  2. Months of recovery and rescue efforts

    It took nine months to complete the rescue and recovery clean-up of the tons of wreckage from the W.T.C.

  3. Brave air passengers

    There was an attempt to retake control of the United Flight 93 by passengers when they heard of the first attacks.

  4. Largest U.S. loss

    The W.T.C. attacks led to the largest loss of lives caused by foreign attacks on U.S. land.

  5. Delayed footage

    The footage of the Pentagon's attacks wasn't released until 2006, as against that of the W.T.C’s that was released immediately.

Why National Day of Solidarity with Muslim Arab and South Asian Immigrants is Important

  1. It promotes equality

    One reason we love this day is that it sets the pace for equal treatment for all Americans, regardless of race, belief, and ethnicity. See what you can do on this day to emulate these values.

  2. It reveals the humanity in us

    Despite the stereotypes, thousands of Americans stand by the marginalized groups, revealing the humane feelings inherent in all humans. We love it when people come together.

  3. It gives hope

    Observation of this day gives us hope that human beings will stand with one another, both in their trying and happy times, regardless of the differences between them. Hope is after all, what keeps us going.

National Day of Solidarity with Muslim Arab and South Asian Immigrants dates

YearDateDay
2023February 20Monday
2024February 20Tuesday
2025February 20Thursday
2026February 20Friday
2027February 20Saturday

Want to sponsor this holiday?

Holidays Straight to Your Inbox

Every day is a holiday!
Receive fresh holidays directly to your inbox.