National Lazy Day 2018 – August 10

In today’s plugged-in world, we often find ourselves wishing for a day when we didn’t have to do anything.

Nothing at all. Not even the tiniest bit of work.

In other words, we long for a lazy day. And yet, when we set aside a day to do nothing, we find it difficult to actually be lazy — as if we’re hardwired to do something, even if we don’t really need to do anything.

Let’s put a stop to that. August 10 is the day to do it. Or not do it.

It’s National Lazy Day. And it’s glorious.

National Lazy Day - History

July 24, 2018
We did nada.

In honor of future National Lazy Days, we wrote this without doing any difficult research. Salute!

1990
Linklater releases "Slacker"

Richard Linklater's film follows a bunch of people whom film critic Peter Travers described as "a generation of bristling minds unable to turn their thoughts into action." You know — lazy people.

1850s
The leisure class is born

Used to be that only the wealthy could afford to do nothing. But in the middle 1800s, working classes began to enjoy a measure of financial security that allowed them to have lazy days.

1819
Irving publishes "Rip Van Winkle"

Washington Irving's character Rip Van Winkle wasn't lazy per se. But he did drink some booze and sleep for 20 years. Homeboy even missed the American Revolution!

The Seventh Day
God rests.

After creating everything in six days, even the creator found time for a lazy day. You should, too.

National Lazy Day Activities

1. Plan something (and by something — we mean nothing)
Don't plan anything. Be lazy. Wake up. Then go back to bed. Then get out of bed. Or stay there. Just don't do anything. It's National Lazy Day! Enjoy!

2. Find a lazy river upon which to float lazily.
Park yourself inside a cushy inner tube and let the river take you downstream.

3. Turn your phone off.
Although sitting around doing nothing but checking our phones for text messages or Facebook notifications may seem like a lazy thing to do, it's not. It's far too active a thing for National Lazy Day.

3 Sleepy Facts About Laziness

1. Oscar Wilde admired lazy people

Or at least his characters did — with one of them opining that "to do nothing at all is the most difficult thing in the world, the most difficult and the most intellectual."

2. Sloths aren't lazy

They've just evolved to conserve energy. (Still, they move so slowly that algae has time to grow on their fur, turning them green and providing a measure of camouflage in the trees.)

3. You can't be lazy if you like etymology

The origin of the word "lazy" is uncertain, but it likely derives from the Middle Low German word "lasich," which meant ... well, lazy.

Why We Love National Lazy Day

A. We're tired as all get-out.
This is a go-go-go world and we're constantly go-go-going. We need a day to do nothing, and we aim to do it — with as little effort as possible.

B. It's good for us.
Science and medicine all point to the same conclusion: We work too hard for too long. National Lazy Day reminds us to step back, take a deep breath and just be alive and lazy for once.

C. We can reconnect.
Observing National Lazy Day means we can reconnect with the things we love — like our families and the great outdoors. Just be sure that — whether you're with family or outside in nature or both — you don't actually do anything. Just. Be. Lazy. For once in your life.

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