Blasé Day – November 25, 2022

Blasé Day, celebrated on November 25, is a strange holiday that allows worldly people to let themselves feel displeased with things they find unimpressive. It’s not surprising that the French have a word for this state of being since they must be displeased with most things, having grown up in a country seeping with art and culture. If you also find yourself to be too cultured and cosmopolitan compared to the easily impressed people around you, this is the time for you to enjoy complaining about the things you find unremarkable. Perhaps you’ll feel pleasure in not having to constantly keep up pretenses.

History of Blasé Day

Blasé is a French word that emerged during the 19th century and has Germanic origins. Someone described as ‘blasé’ is difficult to impress as they are indifferent to things, usually because they have experienced them before. This could be due to overindulgence or having had many interesting and exciting life experiences. For example, someone who travels often and has visited many eye-catching locations might be harder to please.
Those familiar with the French culture know it through literature, art, film, and philosophy. It’s a country rich with a culture that has a very liberal view of life. Despite the heavy influence from the West, French people differ very much when it comes to their attitude, which is the first thing foreigners notice when visiting France. French people are very formal and courteous. They are known for being intellectual and pensive people who value the arts. Because of this, they appear calmer and more collected than most cultures. They show little excitement and enthusiasm. It’s not a matter of being unenthusiastic; French people tend to keep a more blasé front. They are generally less expressive with their emotions and not as dramatic. This makes the holiday very suitable for French people, especially those living abroad and finding things extremely blasé.

This unusual holiday was invented by Wellcat Holidays. Thomas and Ruth Roy are a married couple that have come up with over 80 fun and quirky holidays for people. They have several holidays for every season with many unpredictable and fun ideas. Their copyrighted holidays have been featured in the “Los Angeles Times,” the “Wall Street Journal,” the “Washington Post,” and “U.S.A. Today.” Their holiday “Northern Hemisphere Hoddie-Hoo Day” became so popular that it’s now celebrated in Europe and America.

Blasé Day timeline

19th Century
Origin

The word ‘Blasé’ first originates.

1944
Thomas Roy

Thomas Roy is born.

1980s
Wellcat Holidays

Thomas Roy comes up with an idea for a new holiday and begins publishing them.

Late 1980s
Blasé Day

Wellcat Holidays creates “Blasé Day”.

Blasé Day FAQs

Is blasé an insult?

Blasé has a negative connotation when it refers to someone who is apathetic or uncaring, but it could have a more neutral connotation depending on the context.

Is blasé a scrabble word?

Yes, the word “blasé” is in the scrabble dictionary.

How do you pronounce blasé?

The word ‘blasé’ is pronounced as “bl-ah-zey” but is often mispronounced as “blaze”.

Blasé Day Activities

  1. Be blasé!

    If you’ve spent most of your life faking enthusiasm for things you have absolutely no interest in, this is your chance to let others know that you hate everything around you and experience much joy in their misery. Seize the day and be blasé!

  2. Complain

    Nothing shows people how blasé you are than constantly complaining about the things you find unimpressive. Let people know how worldly you are and that everyone else will have to try harder to meet your standards.

  3. Use #BlaséDay

    For those that struggle to stay silent about the mundane and boring things in their lives, take the day to document all the things you find helplessly tedious by posting about them using #BlaséDay. Maybe you’ll find someone who hates all the same things as you!

5 Fun Facts About French

  1. French was the official language in England

    From 1066 to 1362, after France occupied England, Anglo-Norman French was introduced to the nation, which was only spoken by aristocrats but, because the commoners didn’t speak French, the official language became English in 1362.

  2. Most English words are of French origin

    About 45% of modern English words came from French as a result of the French occupation of England.

  3. It’s spoken globally

    French is one of the most widely spoken languages, aside from English, with 29 countries having French as one of their official languages.

  4. It’s well-preserved

    The French Academy is a council that oversees matters related to the French language, such as adding new words or changing their spelling.

  5. French was not common in France

    Before the 19th century, French was more common in Germany and the Netherlands than in France and it was only after the French Revolution that more French people began speaking the language.

Why We Love Blasé Day

  1. It’s cathartic

    This is the day to let out all your restrained emotions. Take solace in the fact that you’re not the only one who often feels unimpressed with your boring routine and all the things everyone else seems to find so interesting. It’s okay to be a little bored with life sometimes as long as you can let your negative feelings go and move on.

  2. You can allow yourself to do nothing

    Everything is so dull and intolerable, so do nothing! Spend the entire day avoiding everything that makes you feel blasé. We suggest a large window and a warm cup of coffee to pass the time.

  3. Complaining can bring you joy

    Maybe you’ve done a lot of traveling and have to go back to your boring job and your country where there’s nothing to do. Everything is so unimpressive. The only thing there is to do is enjoy complaining about it.

Blasé Day dates

YearDateDay
2022November 25Friday
2023November 25Saturday
2024November 25Monday
2025November 25Tuesday
2026November 25Wednesday

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