National Brothers and Sisters Day – May 2

Happy National Brothers and Sisters Day! Today is dedicated to the people that made your childhood memorable—and your siblings. (Just kidding.) They’ve been there for you during your good times. And they haven’t left your side through the bad (even if they created it by getting you in trouble). Of course, there were probably times where you couldn’t stand the sight of each other. What siblings don’t get into fights over the last piece of gum or a piece of stolen clothing? But National Brothers and Sisters Day is the day to reflect on the best times. Give them a call or email that shows them how important they are to you!

Why We Love National Brothers and Sisters Day

A. You have a special bond with them
Your brothers and sisters know you inside and out. If they’re older than you, they’ve been a part of your life since you were in diapers (they probably even changed a few, and for that, they deserve eternal gratitude). If you’re the older one, you’ve probably helped a sibling or two navigate through life—whether you’re intimidating their bullies or showing them a cool new trick on the swingset. These amazing bonds are what makes your relationship meaningful. Embrace them today and forever more.

B. They understand you
No one will ever “get” you better than your sibling. At our jobs, we have to monitor what we say because we don’t want our thoughts to get misinterpreted. With our friends, we’re allowed to be a little weirder, but we can’t be too weird in case they decide to friend-dump us. But this isn’t the case with your siblings. You can be as crazy as you want, and say everything that comes to mind. They know the true you—and more importantly, they’re stuck with you.

C. They hold all your embarrassing secrets
Remember those horrible fashion trends you participated in? All those toys you obsessed over that you would never be caught dead with today? Your siblings were there for all of it. They have the power in their hands to destroy you if they choose … and they’re being very nice by deciding not to (for the moment). As the saying goes, keep your friends close, your enemies closer … and your siblings closest. You’ll never know what they’ll reveal if you make them angry!

How to Celebrate National Brothers and Sisters Day

1.  Do that special thing
We know that sounds vague, but hear us out. As a child, we tend to develop special bonds with our brothers and sisters. We all have inside jokes, or special traditions. Take today to revisit those special memories and moments with your siblings. Go to the place they taught you to drive. Visit the restaurant that was your favorite as a child. There’s no way to go wrong here, as long as you’re celebrating and spending time together.

2.  Take your sibling to lunch or dinner
Life happens and our daily responsibilities prevent us from spending time with the ones we grew up with. Don’t let that be case be today. Go out to lunch or dinner and catch up on old times. Talk about what’s new in your life and your upcoming events. Maybe this will even start a new tradition, or a habit of catching up more often.

3.  Vacation with them
Speaking of traditions, start an annual one and go on a vacation with your brothers and sisters. Make a list of places you’ve dreamt about visiting, local or internationally, and start checking off your bucket list. Create memories with them that will last a lifetime. (And get the dirt on them, so you’ll be the sibling no one wants to mess with.)

National Brothers and Sisters Day - Survey Results

AMERICANS WITHOUT SIBLINGS ARE PERFECTLY HAPPY THAT WAY
When asked whether they would prefer to have brothers/sisters or be an only child, 38% of sibling-less Americans said they are perfectly happy without brothers and sisters. Only 12% of Americans with siblings would prefer to be an only child.

WOMEN PREFER TO BE THE YOUNGEST CHILD; MEN WOULD RATHER BE THE OLDEST
35% of women would prefer to be the youngest child, 34% the oldest, 17% the middle child, and 14% an only child. Meanwhile, 40% of men would prefer to be the oldest child, 24% the youngest, 20% the middle child, and 16% an only child.

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