The Better Breakfast Day eggs forecast? Sunny.

Convenience, protein keep us scrambling for more

Remember the “incredible edible egg”? This 1978 television spot (and jingle) went viral long before anyone knew what viral meant. Honestly though, eggs didn’t need much help back then. Most consumers considered eggs a safe bet for breakfast as well as most other meals and snacks.

More than 40 years later, with Better Breakfast Day set for today, eggs are still on a roll. The government’s most recent Dietary Guidelines for Americans no longer recommends a limit on dietary cholesterol intake as it once did.

“For healthy human beings, there’s no limitations for egg consumption. It is a good source of protein that can be easily added to a person’s meal.” — Texas Tech Obesity and Metabolic Health Lab researcher Samudani Dhanasekara

Plus, the American Heart Association notes that “eggs are an efficient, rich source of protein and vitamins” that contain only 78 calories each. Further, large eggs, which offer about six grams of protein, “are a good source of other nutrients, including vitamin D (which aids bone health and the immune system) and choline (which helps metabolism and liver function, as well as fetal brain development).”

And we still seem to love them.

High protein in no time

A new survey from National Today and Three Bridges Egg Bites, a Better Breakfast Day sponsor, shows 54% of Americans prefer eggs over other standard breakfast fare like oatmeal, cereal and fruit. The survey also asked respondents to take prep time into consideration. Not surprisingly, “convenience” turned out to be the most important factor in their breakfast food choices. 

Eggs score high in protein and convenience. (Brett Jordan)

Protein plays a big role as well. Survey participants selected “high protein” by a wide margin (41%) over other factors like “low sugar,” “organic” and “gluten-free” when it came to breakfast priorities. 

One other notable result: Americans have a lot going on in the morning. Nearly 40% revealed that they have less than 10 minutes to spend on breakfast prep during the start of a typical day. Another 20% spend less than five minutes. The moral? Americans not only need more protein — they also need more time.

A new survey from National Today and Three Bridges Egg Bites, a Better Breakfast Day sponsor, shows 54% of Americans prefer eggs over other standard breakfast fare like oatmeal, cereal and fruit.

While it’s always a good idea to consult with a doctor or nutritionist before making major changes to your diet, Samudani Dhanasekara, a doctoral candidate in the Obesity and Metabolic Health Lab at Texas Tech, has a positive outlook on eggs.

“For healthy human beings, there’s no limitation for egg consumption,” he says. “It is a good source of protein that can be easily added to a person’s meal.”