​Active Aging Week 2018 – September 23-29

Last week in September

The International Council on Active Aging began the first Active Aging Week in 2003. This week is meant to celebrate how positive the process of aging can truly be. Active Aging Week encourages adults over the age of 50 to take advantage of all that life has to offer. The goal of this week is to promote wellness initiatives and to get bodies up and moving!

​Active Aging Week - History

​2017
Over 3,000 hosts​

More than 3,000 host organizations are registered to participate in Active Aging Week. ​

​2003
First Active Aging Week​

The ICAA launches the very first Active Aging Week. ​

​2001
ICAA born ​

The International Council on Active Aging (ICAA) began its work.

​1995
Aging & Health Program​

The World Health Organization launched the Aging & Health Program with the goal of responding to the aging population. ​

​1950
National Committee on Aging​

The National Social Welfare Assembly organized the first National Committee on Aging​

How to Observe ​Active Aging Week

1. Host an event
You can sign up to become a host for an Active Aging Week event. By becoming a registered host, you can help spread the word throughout your community.

2. Share a personal story
Have you or someone you know benefited from becoming actively involved in wellness initiatives that pertain to aging? If so, consider sharing your story. Others are sure to benefit from learning about the successes or failures that make up so many different wellness journeys.

3. Talk about Active Aging Week on social media
Social media platforms are an excellent way to bring awareness to important initiatives. By discussing Active Aging Week on social media, you might just encourage someone to get out and start pursuing a healthier lifestyle.

​5 Things You Need To Know About Aging

1. ​More women than men

About 57% of older adults in the U.S. are women. ​

2. ​We lose bones

We usually have 350 different bones at birth, but as we ease into adulthood bones fuse together. Ultimately, we end up with only 206 bones. ​

3. ​Now that's a long life

​The oldest human recorded in history, Jeanne Louise Calment, was born in France and lived to be 122 years old.

4. Is staying active the Fountain of Youth?

Research has found that staying active can slow down the aging process. ​

5. No sweat

Some studies have shown that we sweat less as we age. ​

Why ​Active Aging Week is Important

A. Active Aging Week encourages older adults to get moving
For some older adults who reside in assisted living communities. or have mobility issues, just getting out and about can present quite a challenge. Active Aging Week highlights all of the different ways that someone can participate in simple exercise. There truly is something for everyone.

B. Active Aging Week creates a sense of community
We're much more likely to accomplish our goals if we have other people helping to keep us accountable. Active Aging Week helps bring communities of adults together to work towards a common wellness cause. Some groups have even taken on yearlong walking initiatives!

C. International coverage
Australia, India, Ireland, Canada, and the U.S. all participate in Active Aging Week. It's inspiring to think about such a large collection of people working towards the shared goal of active aging.

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